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abstract

abstract

477

The value of monitoring nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing (NPTR) for three consecutive nights in the forensic identification.

Zhang, Y1; Ma, G1; Feng, J1; Yang, X1; Wu, X2; Chen, S1; Luo, S1; Zhang, B1; Chen, J1; Zang, Z1; Qi, T1; Wang, B1; Lai, Y1; Ye, L1; Huang, Z1

1: The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, China; 2: Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University,China

Objective: The aim of our study was to initially investigate the necessity of monitoring nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing (NPTR) for three consecutive nights in the forensic identification of men's sexual dysfunction.

Material and Method: 120 cases of forensic patients were collected in our outpatient department from December 2009 to April 2017. The NPTR test time of all patients was more than 5 hours per night for 3 consecutive nights. 66 patients, the mean age was 38.9 years old (ranges from 18 to 68 years old), had no effective erection occurred in the first two nights. The non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis test was used to test for differences of three nights’ NPTR test parameters, including tumescence activated units (TAUs), rigidity activated units (RAUs), average rigidity, average durations in minutes of erectile episodes with rigidity>60%, numbers of effective erectile episodes. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Among the 120 patients, the mean age was 36.8 years old (ranges from 17 to 68 years old), 36 patients (30%) had at least one effective erection on the first night after NPTR test. 18 patients (15%) had effective erections on the second night, and 9 patients (7.5%) showed effective erection only on the third night. There were 66 patients without effective erection in the first two nights, and the results of the first night, the second night and the third night were compared with each other. The parameters of tumescence activated units (TAUs), rigidity activated units (RAUs), average rigidity, average durations in minutes of erectile episodes with rigidity>60% was no significant difference. But Statistical significance was found for numbers of effective erectile episodes between the first and the third night, and also the second and the third night (P = 0.01).

Conclusion: Forensic identification is more cautious in the differential diagnosis of erectile dysfunction in men. 7.5% of all forensic patients of this study had no effective erections on the first two nights but at least one effective erections occurred on the third night. NPTR continuous testing for three nights could reduce the misdiagnosis of organic ED.

Disclosure:

Work supported by industry: no.

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