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Possibility to use evaluation of cognitive error frequency in the clinical practice for women suffering with lifeling vaginismus in Georgia

Marshania, Z1; Kamushadze, T2

1: GEORGIAN SOCIETY FOR SEXUAL MEDICINE, Georgia; 2: POSSIBILITY TO USE EVALUATION OF COGNITIVE ERROR FREQUENCY IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR WOMEN SUFFERING WITH LIFELONG VAGINISMUS IN GEORGIA

Objective: Lifelong vaginismus occurs when a woman has never been able to have vaginal sex starting from her first sexual intercourse and it is defined as an involuntary spasm of the muscles located in the outer third of the vaginal barrel, as well as the pelvic muscles. Vaginismus needs to differentiate with other genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (for instance dispareunia and vulvodinia). The aim of our study was to assess perspectives of using in the clinical practice evaluation of cognitive error frequency in the women suffering with above-mentioned mental sexual disorder.

Methods: In our study participated 57 married Georgian women (27 patients suffering with vaginismus and 30 healthy women from the control group). The age of women in the both groups was comparable to each other. 27 patients with vaginismus were virgins and did not have vaginal sex for a period from six month to 7 years after marriage. They were observed in the Department of Sexual Medicine of “Enmedic” Clinic (Tbilisi, Georgia). All of women from the both groups answered to questions from Types of Thinking Scale Questionnary - “Cognitive Distortions Scale” (CDS) by Covin R.& Dozois JA (2011). All of 57 patients after reading of about 10 types of thinking were given a description of each thinking type. The task was to try and understand the thinking type that was described. Dates from the both groups were processed statistically using a dependent t test with Bonferroni adjustment.

Results: Our study showed that the Index of five types of cognitive errors (“Labeling”, “Mental Filter”, “Personalization”, “Should Statements“, “Minimizing or Disqualifying the Positive”) among group of women with vaginismus was higher than in the control group. Difference between groups was statistically reliable ( P<0.05).

Conclusion: Ability to assess and correct biases in thinking is central to cognitive-behavioral therapy. Since above-mentioned therapy remains "Gold Standard" in the treatment of vaginismus measuring of cognitive errors could be have clinical importance in case of vaginismus. It may either help clinical sexologists in diagnostic of lifelong vaginismus or to be used as a predictor for success-rate of cognitive-behavioral therapy of above-mentioned female sexual disorder.

Disclosure:

Work supported by industry: no.

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