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Comparison of national institutes of health-chronic prostatitis symptom index with international index of erectile function-5 in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: A large cross-sectional study in China

Gao, J1; Zhang, X1

1: The first affiliate hospital of Anhui medical university, China

Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the relationship between NIH-CPSI and IIEF-5 in Chinese men with CP/CPPS.

Material and Methods: a large cross-sectional and multicenter survey was conducted from July 2012 to January 2014. Male participants were recruited from urology clinics which were located at the five cities in China. All men participated the survey by completing a verbal questionnaire, which consisted of socio-demographics, past medical history, sexual history and self-estimated scales (e.g., the Chinese version of IIEF-5 and NIH-CPSI).

Results. The results showed that 1,280 men completed the survey, with a response rate of 76.56%. Their mean age and BMI scores were 34.50 ± 9.20 years and 24.36 ± 1.70 kg/m2, respectively. Based on the CP/CPPS definition, a total of 801 men were diagnosed as having CP/CPPS. Men with CP/CPPS reported higher scores of NIH-CPSI and lower scores of IIEF-5 than men without CP/CPPS (P<0.001 for all). Furthermore, NIH-CPSI scores were significantly negative correlated with IIEF-5 scores (P<0.001 for all). The total scores of NIH-CPSI were significantly stronger correlated with question 5 than other questions of IIEF-5 (Adjusted r=-0.70, P<0.001). The total scores of IIEF-5 were significantly strongest correlated with pain symptoms scores of NIH-CPSI (Adjusted r=-0.70, P<0.001). Strongest correlation was found between QoL impact and question 5 of IIEF-5 (Adjusted r=-0.74, P<0.001).

Conclusion. The findings suggested that NIH-CPSI scores were significantly negative correlated with IIEF-5 scores. Strongest correlation was found between QoL impact and question 5 of IIEF-5.

Disclosure:

Work supported by industry: no.

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