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abstract

abstract

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Visual patterns of sexual desire among male and female participants: an original and exploratory eye tracking study

Bolmont, 1; Bianchi-Demicheli, 2; Cheval, 3

1: University hospital of Geneva, Switzerland; 2: University hospital of Genev; 3: University of Geneva

Sexual desire is defined as "an increase in the frequency and intensity of thoughts / fantasies and desire sexual intercourse, desire to interact with each other". While the eyes and the direction of gaze represent a valid technology to capture person’s attention and interest toward a specific target, few studies have investigated the specific pattern of visual exploration linked to perception of sexual desire. To explore in heterosexual participants what parts of the body are the more important when they visually explore a person and feel sexual desire using gaze patterns, which is considered a spontaneous, unconscious, and

Heterosexual females and males (N = 106) performed a picture-viewing task with simultaneous eye-tracking recording in which they were asked to made an explicit judgment of perceived sexual desire, looking at sensual pictures of heterosexual couples. Participants’ objectively assessed total duration of fixations (in seconds) of the visual area of interest (i.e., face and body).

Participants, watching at stimuli of couples, explored longer the women than the men (p < .001), they also explored longer the body than the face (p < .001). Detailed analyzes of gaze pattern between the face and the body revealed they explored longer the face of men than the face of women (p = .05), while they explored longer the body of women than the body of men (p < .001). Moreover, participants explored longer the body of women than the face of women (p < .001), while they explored longer the face of men than the body of men (p = .001). Gender differences results revealed male participants explored longer the women stimuli than female participants (p < .001), while female participants explored longer the men stimuli than male participants (p < .001). Males participants explored the face area as long as the females participants, idem for the body area. Moreover, male participants explored longer the body of women stimuli than female participants (p < .001), while female participants explored longer the body of men than male participants (p = .006). Finally, female participants explored longer the face of men than male participants (p < .001). However, male participants explored the face of men stimuli as long as female participants.

 These results open a new avenue in understanding the genesis of the perception of the sexual desire associated to visual stimuli by revealing what are the most relevant parts of the body to feel some sexual desire.

Disclosure:

Work supported by industry: no.

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